Have You Mispronounced Words Cos You’ve Only Ever Read Them? #AmReading

pronounce words readingReading has been a lifelong passion, and English not my native tongue, so I’ve had a few embarrassing moments of not knowing how to correctly pronounce words that I’ve read and written often. (I used to mispronounce ‘vehemently’ as ‘Ve-He-mently’ for some time before I heard it spoken in a TV series.)

So it was with a fair bit of amusement (i.e. laughing at myself) that I read this article about words we mispronounce because we’ve never heard them spoken. Someone sent it across after we’d had a bit of a discussion on how to pronounce Greenwich (not as “Green-witch”, but as “Gren-itch”). Pronouncing words you’ve only ever read can be tricky. The article says:

Does any of this really matter? If I say “SKED-ule” and you say “SHED-ule”, will any farcical misunderstandings or tragic loss of life ensue? Is the controversy over “con-TROV-ersy” not just a waste of everyone’s breath? Sure, but that was never the point. Like so many linguistic arguments, the power-struggles over correct pronunciation are most often proxies for issues of snobbery and class. The completely unpredictable pronunciations of many proper names in English, for example, act as a kind of secret code for the elect. Plainly the aristocracy have better things to do than to laboriously speak all the syllables in a word, and so Cholmondeley is pronounced “Chumley”. Obviously. And if you don’t know that Magdalene College, Cambridge, is actually pronounced “Maudlin” (and how could you ever guess?), that instantly marks you out as an outsider.

I still feel embarrassed about some of my mistakes (I did not realize Yosemite was pronounced ‘Yose-mi-tee’ until last year), and the fact that some words are pronounced very differently by Americans and British doesn’t help either (‘respite’, for instance). Malapropisms and eggcorns abound in my surroundings, and make things worse. It is good to know I’m not the only one having a hard time with pronunciations, though: here are a few more people who have made these goof-ups.

A dear friend of mine, while learning English, couldn’t get the hang of ‘Kitchen.’ She invariably called it ‘Chicken’. I corrected her, of course. It has remained a fond memory, and we dissolve into laughter every time we talk about it. I’ll only ever correct a pronunciation if I know the speaker very well though, and then always in a private setting.

What about you? Ever ‘mis-pronounce’ a word? Any phrases you got wrong, or heard someone else utter an eggcorn or a malapropism? Have you ever had trouble pronouncing a word in the right way? Do you feel it is snobbish to correct mispronunciations in other people?


I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment of August 25th!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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What are Your Thoughts on #Writing and Coffee? #WriteBravely

Write Tribe Day FoxToday is the last day of the Write Tribe Festival of Words. Yesterday’s prompt was interview someone on your blog,” and today’s is a rather cryptic one: “If we were having coffee.”

I’d like to thank everyone for their patience with my daily posts, and to those who have visited and commented– I’m grateful, and am working on visiting back!. I’ve indulged myself this week, but shall go back to regular programming from the next one– one to two posts a week, and a lot of visiting in between.

Writing and coffee go together for a lot of writers, and the magical power of this beverage is said to fuel stories. Since I’m more of a tea drinker, I’ve naturally taken today’s prompt as an excuse for fiction,  and here’s the story:

Writing and Coffee
(Click on image for larger version)

 


What are your thought on writing and coffee? Love it, hate it? Do you have a coffee story? What do you think of the flash fiction here– what do you think it is about? Do you write fiction based on prompts?

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I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment on August 25th!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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Would You Join in the We Are the World Blogfest? #WATWB #WriteBravely

Write Tribe Day FoxToday is the sixth day of the Write Tribe Festival of Words. Yesterday’s prompt was “write a letter to someone,” and today’s is “interview someone on your blog.”

If you’ve read Daily (w)rite before, you know that I help co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest (WATWB). But for the purposes of this post, I’ll pretend I know nothing about it, and use this prompt to interview Belinda Witzenhausen, my partner-in- WATWB, and hope that it will persuade some of you to join this event!

WATWB is an event where participants add a link and an excerpt to News that shows the good side of humanity, in less than 500 words.

A post is eligible if

-it holds the badge,

-is posted over the last weekend of the month, and

-mentions and links to a piece of positive news.

These can be added to a regular post in order to be considered as participation.

Blogfest


  1. What is We are the World Blogfest?

We are the World Blogfest is what I would like to call a “positivity” beacon, shining light through what seems to be the never-ending darkness and negativity prevalent in social media these days. #WATWB is a group of dedicated bloggers led by five co-hosts each month, who choose to do our part to infuse social media with all the good stories that are out there. We hope to share the stories that show kindness, compassion, hope, overcoming challenges and in general, the impressive resilience of the human spirit. On the last Friday of every month, we post our stories on our blogs then visit the rest of the blogs where we comment, like and share as many #WATWB posts as we can.

2. How did the We Are The World Blogfest come to be?

In January, being totally frustrated and overwhelmed with the way people were treating each other on social media I wrote a blog post titled “Be The Change”.  My post was truly born out of being totally overwhelmed by all the negativity on my social media feeds. I’m not into complaining about something without first trying to do something to change it. I guess it struck a chord with quite a few people and various dialogues opened within a group of online friends, including yourself. In one of our discussions we decided that we needed to do something and while bouncing ideas around, you suggested a blogfest which seemed to be a perfect platform, thus we put together WATWB.

We Are the World Blogfest3. WATWB is a monthly event. Do you find it difficult to come up with a post each month? What tips would you give to potential participants?

Not at all. I think we all have a cause or topic that we are passionate about. I have a social services background and am co-owner of a website called ProfessorOwl’sBookCorner.com dedicated to children with special needs. In our monthly newsletter, we often feature profiles of “heroes” who are children with special needs who have overcome odds and are thriving. That is what I’m passionate about…I love stories about people beating the odds, ignoring labels and living life on their terms. I think if you can find something meaningful for you, it makes this whole experience inspirational. My biggest tip is to be yourself, follow your passions/causes and really involve yourself in the process. The first month might be a challenge but the more you participate the more you get out of it. Since WATWB’s inception, I sadly had a death in the family as well as some personal challenges and I found going through the posts very empowering and cathartic, it made a difference.

4. How can WATWB be beneficial to a participant’s blog?

I love doing WATWB because it spreads positivity but it also helps you make connections to other like-minded bloggers. We are starting to build a positive, global, interactive online community. We have both a FB Group and FB Page where we interact with other co-hosts, offer support and help each other out.  We have bloggers from all around the world and from all walks of life opening both our eyes and minds to other global perspectives.

6. What is the one request you would make to all participants of WATWB?

PARTICIPATE!!!  LIKE, COMMENT and SHARE the love! For this to be effective we need help to share the message. One of my favorite quotes is from Margaret Mead “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” I truly believe this, I would love for the bloggers of WATWB to take up that challenge, changing the world one blog at a time. 🙂

7. Why should a blogger sign up for the WATWB?

If you are tired of negativity and want to become part of an amazing supportive blogging community please join us! Help change the face of social media!


Do you get overwhelmed by the negativity on social media? Wish you could do something about it? Here’s your chance! To Sign up: CLICK HERE. To know more: CLICK HERE.

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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What letter would you write? #WriteBravely

Write Tribe Day FoxToday is the fifth day of the Write Tribe Festival of Words. Yesterday’s prompt was write about a day in your (or someone else’s) life,” and today’s is ‘write a letter to someone.’

I’m going again with fiction today– this was a piece written in the form of a letter addressed to a father, a piece of flash published in the Outrider review, a magazine based out of the US.

It was written during a workshop led by author Suchen Christine Lim, many years ago, in a crowded library room filled with us, her eager fans. The prompt, of course, was to write a letter, but the letter that emerged on paper was a fictional one, which I think will one day become part of a novel. Here it is:

Write a letter to someone

 

Do you read or write Flash Fiction? Ever written a piece based on prompts? Written in a workshop in a crowded room? What do you have to say about ‘I’ll be your father?’ What letter would you write, if asked to do so?


I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment of August 25th!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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What is a Day in Your Life Like? #WriteBravely

Write Tribe Day FoxToday is the fourth day of Write Tribe Festival of Words. Yesterday’s prompt was “write about a place, real or virtual,” and today’s is “write about a day in your (or someone else’s) life.”

I’m going with fiction this time, In the Fox’s Parlour, a piece of flash published in the Jet Fuel review, and nominated by them for the Pushcart and the Best of the Net.

Here’s an excerpt– for the entire piece, click here.

In the Parlour of the FoxWe’ll meet outside the city at noon, wheelchairs clanking, and I’ll teach you how to make out with a fox. Foxes have longer tongues than women. They will reach into your throat, down to your stomach. They’ll extract your truth, pleasuring you the while.

If you’re in pain, they’ll find its hard ball, stroke it till it dissolves on their black tongues. Don’t be afraid, they will do it at noon, under a tent of prayer flags strung together on three bamboo sticks. Three is magic: you, me, and the fox.
 
Your family tells you be thankful for what you got, of the way you can paint tracks on sand with your wheelchair. I’ll show you how to dance, walk on your palms, your head, your wrists. Who needs feet?

I like to think of it as a story of hope amidst despair, of taking refuge in the fantastical when the real becomes too much, of the descent (or ascent) into our animal selves when we’re pushed to the edge, when we’re pitied, reviled, rejected. This flash is the day in the life of two people on wheelchairs.

My days are not very interesting, so I chose a fictional day in the lives of fictional characters.

What is a day in your life like? Do you read or write Flash Fiction? What do you have to say about ‘In the Fox’s Parlour?’


I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment of August 25th!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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