Want to Hear the Magical Tale of Two Puppies? #WATWB

We are the World BlogfestTo spread peace and humanity on social media, a few of us have worked together to create the We are the World Blogfest. In a world where news and social media are awash with negativity, we aim to turn the focus on to small but significant stories that renew our faith in humanity.

We are the World Blogfest is here with its thirteenth edition.

The cohosts for the APRIL 2018 WATWB are: Shilpa Garg, Dan Antion, Simon Falk, Michelle Wallace , Mary Giese. Go visit them please and thank them for their hard work behind the scenes.
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My friend Guilie Castillo is a passionate advocate for dog rescue, whose book It’s About the Dog has hit the stands recently.

For today’s We are the World blogfest, I want to share how Guilie and her friends have become the light in the darkness.

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Dog Rescue PawsThank you so much for having me here, Damyanti—especially for the We Are the World ‘fest! In the spirit of spreading light and hope, I thought I’d share a dog rescue story of not just hope but Magic. Many of us at #WATWB are involved with projects to help others, whether it’s children or the elderly or animals or the environment.

The challenge is enormous and it’s all too easy to feel discouraged, depressed even. (In It’s About the Dog, aimed at people new to rescue, I even included a section on how to deal with the inevitable despair and dejection; it’s that prevalent.) So I’m sharing this with the hope you’ll find in it the encouragement to keep you making the world a better place, one action at a time.

Back at the beginning of April, a volunteer from Rescue Paws Curaçao (one of the island’s foremost rescue organizations) spotted an emaciated female dog wandering on a side street. She followed her into ever smaller and smaller streets, until the dog ducked under a fence and into a shabby, neglected yard. Other dogs were there, also emaciated, including some puppies that looked to be three or four weeks old. No sign of food, or even water.

Dog Rescue PawsTwo of the organization’s directors, Mirjan and Karin, armed with diplomatic smiles and more fluent Papiamentu (the island’s language) than the Dutch volunteer’s, came to talk to the property owner and see what they

could do for the dogs. The owner, an elderly preacher who they found out lived on barely 300 guilders a month (about USD 150), was welcoming enough, but seemed more interested in talking God than dogs. Eventually he agreed to let them put kibble out, which allowed them to get a closer look at the dogs.

The puppies they thought were around a month old, once they were brought to the vet, turned to be four months old. They were so scrawny, so malnourished even from the womb (judging by the shape their mom was in), that they weighed in at less than a third of the minimum recommended weight for their age. Their little bodies, tiny bones sticking out everywhere, felt as lithe as a bird’s.

Dog recueTheir ‘owner’, the preacher, didn’t seem to understand he had to provide for the dogs; his reasoning, born not of cruelty but ignorance, was that God provided for the trees and nature in general, and dogs, being a part of nature, also fell into this ‘providence’. Rescue Paws explained, as gently—but effectively—as they could, that this was not the case and, due to the man’s limited income, they are now providing food and medicine to ensure the dogs’ wellbeing.

But two of the puppies—a black-and-white furry babe missing an eye, whom Karin named Seppe, and a white-and-brown lovely that Mirjan named Mala— weren’t eating, didn’t even want water. The day they found them out in the mondi, the wild brush around the house, lying as if dead, they decided more desperate measures would be needed to save these puppies.

The vet determined it wasn’t parvo, fortunately (parvovirus is a death sentence for dogs this young); most likely it was some kind of intestinal infection, but they were so weak, so underfed, and the infection so advanced and entrenched in their little bodies, that they’d need round-the-clock care. Literally 24/7.

Clearly far beyond what the preacher could provide, even if he had been willing.

All of which meant that they needed a foster.

Fosters, as anyone involved with rescue knows, do not grow on trees. A good foster—someone with experience (or with the willingness to learn), with the dedication to follow instructions, with enough flexibility in their schedule to fit in late nights and early mornings and emergency trips to the vet—is impossible to find.

But I promised you magic, and Magic delivered. The impossible foster was found: a wonderful woman who met all the requirements and added a few more just for kicks. She took Seppe, and Mirjan—despite already having a houseful of dogs—stayed with little Mala.

Every morning both women brought the puppies to the vet, to be hooked up to an IV for fluids (and antibiotics and vitamins), and stayed on it all day. At night, neither got much sleep, trying to give them water and broth on an eyedropper, trying to feed them bits of chicken and rice. They kept them clean and comfortable, looked after their every need, showering them with love; maybe, just maybe, that would give them a reason to fight, and live.

For Seppe, the improvement started within the week. Still weak, and far from out of the woods, but he was getting better. Mala, however, wasn’t. He still refused to eat more than a mouthful or two, wasn’t drinking nearly enough liquids, seemed tired and listless. Hope, small as it had been, was now dwindling down to nothing.

And then—yes, Magic. Maybe the meds finally kicked in. Maybe the bits of broth Mirjan managed to get into him finally added up into some nourishment. Maybe it was all that love surrounding him, as if he’d decided he couldn’t let down these people who’d become so invested in his recovery. So it came to pass that, one fine day, Mala began to wag his tail. And to walk. And to eat. And then, at last, to play.

Now that Mala is so much better, Mirjan brought him over for a visit with his brother Seppe last week, and the reunion was so extraordinary—they climbed all over each other, licking and play-barking and generally acting absolutely ecstatic to see each other—that the foster offered to take Mala in, too, so that the two brothers could walk—well, more like chase and race—the last steps of their recovery together.

Their story isn’t finished yet. Rescue Paws is trying to find them a forever family together. It’s incredibly difficult to find homes for rescue dogs, not just in Curaçao but anywhere, really, so it’s far-fetched, but… well, maybe there’s still a little bit of Magic left for these two. We hope so. After all, hope is what dog rescuers are made of.

(Would you like to help Rescue Paws save more dogs? Find out more about them on Facebook and at their website. You can donate via PayPal, too—every bit helps!)

Thank you so much, Damyanti, for giving space to little Mala and Seppe, and to everyone for visiting! I hope you found a bit of light in this story, and I look forward to chatting with you in the comments. Do you have dogs, or other animals at home yourself? Have you ever rescued a street dog? Do you think you could? Do you volunteer at any shelters or animal sanctuaries? Just for kicks, care to guess how many dogs Mirjan, the Rescue Paws director, lives with? Hint: it’s more than my eight.

If you’d like to take part in this blogfest, sign up in the WE ARE THE WORLD Blogfest Linky List below and please help spread the word on social media via the hashtag #WATWB.

~~~GUIDELINES~~~

  1. Keep your post to below 500 words.
  2. All we ask is you link to a human news story on your blog on the last Friday of each month, one that shows love and humanity.
  3. Join us in sharing news that warms the cockles of our heart. No story is too big or small, as long as it goes beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.
  4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD BLOGFEST Badge on your sidebar, and help us spread the word on social media. Tweets, Facebook shares, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. More We Are the World Blogfest signups mean more friends, love and light for all of us.
  5. We’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships with everyone who signs on as participants in the coming months.
  6. Add your post HERE so we can all find it quickly.

 The We are The World Blogfest Community Page on Facebook will continue to show links to the various blog posts. So you don’t have to hurry through. You can always enjoy one a day. Like the page and share your posts on the thread for the purpose.

Paws dog rescue

Dog Rescue PawsI’m going to pick up Guilie’s book today, and I hope you do, too. It is the perfect gift for the dog lover in your family, and for you, if you are interested in helping animals in dire straits. I’m also sending off a small donation to Rescue Paws, so more Malas and Seppes are given a second chance at life.

With each comment on this post, you’re being entered into It’s About the Dog giveaway!

ABOUT GUILIE: A Mexican writer and dog rescuer who moved to Curaçao “for six months”—and, twelve years later, has yet to find a reason to leave. Her work has been published online and in print anthologies. THE MIRACLE OF SMALL THINGS is her first book. Find Guilie on Facebook and Twitter, at Quiet Laughter where she blogs about life and writing, and at Life in Dogs where she blogs about life and… well, dogs.

We Are the World Blogfest

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What is Your Blog About?

What is your blog about?What is your blog about? What do you talk about, when you talk about blogging? What’s your niche? Your brand? Why would people read you?

Someone I know and respect asked me these questions last week, and I was stumped. My blog is a bit of everything: author interviews,  my writing life, travel, issues of the day that I feel strongly about. I’ve just let it grow, or not, as it will.

Mostly though, it is about interaction, about all the comments this site receives, and the conversations it generates on social media. I’ve not been very good with responding this year (life has taken its toll), though I always return visits, sooner or later.

Daily (w)rite has been around for ten years, and I haven’t planned on any huge changes to the way I run it.

For those of you who have been visiting this blog for a while, would you suggest I make changes? For anyone reading this post, what is your blog about? Why did you create it? How long has it been around? What are your plans for your blog?


I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment of April 27!

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Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have posts delivered to your inbox: SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL.

What have you been #reading ?

Reading books and short stories ParamoReading novels and short stories has been my salvation for as long as I can remember. In the past few months, I’ve struggled with travel and other family issues, and reading has once again come to the rescue.

These novels and short stories have been on my bedside table: I’ve dipped into one or the other as time and health permitted, and they have, as always, taken me away from my self, my problems, and made me care for people who do not exist.

  1. Pedro Paramo’: Jean Rulfo: Surrealism at its best. Vivid, lifelike characters that populate a story given to us in fits and starts, and dizzying POV shifts between the present and the past, the alive and the dead, the major characters and the minor.Nightmarish in parts, stunningly beautiful at others, this book will hold up to repeated readings.
  2. Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingslover: Smashing writing and characters, especially the child at the heart of it all. Some of the lines from the book still resonate.Reading books and short stories Erofeyev
  3. The Pool in the Desert by Sarah Jeannette Duncan: Gorgeous short stories, and excellent observations of the colonial life in India. The language is of the early 190s, when it was written, and the author has a fascinating life story.
  4. Tiger Hills by Sarita Mandanna: an epic tale with some brilliant descriptions of the Indian town of Coorg, in colonial India.reading novels and short stories
  5. How to be both: Ali Smith: A stunning novel. I took time to read it, re-reading bits and pieces, but if you love novels that take you away from yourself and make you think, you can’t miss this one.The novel is in two voices in two parts, both equally compelling and incredibly clever in different ways. Either part could come before or after the other, and that’s the whole point. I’m a Smith fan, but this was one of her best, really. Definitely recommended.
  6. Life with an Idiot by Victor Erofeyev: This is a cruel, brilliant, unputdownable collection full of the ugliest and the best of humanity, sparkling sentences, and stories that open up a whole new world. The title story is a difficult, but absolutely worthwhile read.Reading books and short stories Erofeyev
  7. Devil in Winter by Lisa Kleypas : A fast, pacy romance, because every once in a while I need me some light, not-very-stressful reading.

Of course, I’m also reading fabulous short stories for the Forge Literary Magazine  where I’m the editor of the month. Please spread the word to any writers in your life who write short stories, flash fiction, and essays or creative non-fiction.

What novels and short stories are you reading? Would you recommend a book you read this year? Drop me the title in the comments, and I’ll look it up!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have posts delivered to your inbox: click here to SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL

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Want #WritingTips from a Bestselling Author and #Writing Guru?

David Corbett writing adviceHere on Daily (w)rite, as part of the guest post series, it is my absolute pleasure today to welcome David Corbett, bestselling author of several books of crime fiction, and writing teacher extraordinaire.

His book on the craft of characterization, The Art of Character, has been called “a writer’s bible,” and it will soon appear in translation in both Spanish and Mandarin.

More in the extended biography at the end of the post. For now, I’ll invite you to read his responses with some sterling writing advice, some of which I’ve highlighted in blue.

 

writing advice1. What are your preoccupations as a writer?

Interesting word choice – “preoccupation.” Better than “obsession,” I suppose, though perhaps not as accurate.

I would say all my stories deal with the struggle for dignity and decency – and love – in a world that prizes deceit, power, self-interest, and blame. And almost all my stories deal with one or more character becoming a bit more brave, honest, and caring.

I suppose I’m also always looking for some way to find meaning in life in the face of certain death. I lost both my brother and my first wife at far too young an age to horrible illnesses. I had to come up with a reason for sticking around. That continues to inform my writing.

2. You have a background in criminal investigation. How has that informed your writing in terms of both plot and character?

My background is as a private investigator, which is a bit different than “criminal investigation,” which suggests law enforcement. If I worked on a criminal case, I typically worked for the defense, meaning I was in an adversarial role to law enforcement, though ostensibly we were both trying to establish the truth (he says wryly).

One learns a great deal about power in the so-called justice system. I saw how cancerous ambition could be. I saw how seemingly convenient – and easy – it is to lie your way out of a problem. I learned that money buys justice, and how, in the courtroom, the rules of gravity no longer apply. I saw how similar our legal and political systems are—both are far too often maddeningly unaccountable for the horrible consequences they create. And yet, for all that, I also saw a great deal of personal integrity, commitment, and humility.

Incidentally, I get asked often if women can be PIs. I respond that some of the very best private investigators I’ve ever met are women. Know why? Women listen.

I’m currently teaching creative writing to prison inmates, and my background in criminal defense has helped immeasurably. I know how easy it is to find oneself on the wrong side of the law. And it’s reminded me of something I always tell my students, and which I’m reminded of every time I step into that prison: “Justify, don’t judge your characters.”

writing advice quote3. Could you recommend five novels that you think all aspiring crime writers should read?

If I had to name just five they would probably be:

The Long Goodbye, by Raymond Chandler: Established the crime novel as worthy of literary regard. I think of it as more akin to The Day of the Locust than a crime novel.

Double Indemnity, by James M. Cain: One of the few books I picked up and didn’t put down until I was finished. Tight prose, exquisite plotting.

Red Dragon, by Thomas Harris: I’m not one for serial killer stories (I still think The Collector is my favorite), but this is considered by many the absolute best. Well-researched, with one of the most compelling villains ever created.

Clockers, by Richard Price: Raised the bar for all crime writers. Puts the criminal and the cop on equal moral footing. Hugely influential—Pelecanos, Lehane, etc.

Case Histories, by Kate Atkinson: Once again, the crime novel as literature, with possibly the most admirable private investigator ever created. But just trying to narrow the list down to five made me feel as though I was being unfair to a great many others.

Writing advice4. Is there a work of crime fiction that you wish you’d written, and why?

Any of the five I just mentioned would qualify. I also think Dennis Lehane’s work is particularly strong. His focus is always on place and community, not just cops and robbers, something I think he’d admit he learned from his own mentor, Richard Price, who once said that if you want to convey a certain place and time, put a dead body in it and cut a detective loose.

5. What writing advice would you give to someone outlining their novel?

  • First and foremost: Never forget that characters create the story. Until you have a basic understanding of your characters, any story you try to create risks becoming formulaic. You also risk turning your characters into “plot puppets.”
  • The other problem with outlines is that one tends to think in terms of: This happened, then this happened, then this… And that can create a story that reads like “one darn thing after another.
  • Stories aren’t about what happens. They’re about what goes wrong—and then making that problem progressively worse.
  • So if you’re outlining, don’t think in terms of what is likely to happen. Create a problem, then build a sequence of follow-up scenes through cause-and-effect that intensify that problem.

However, once again, you can’t neglect your characters, for they’re the ones creating the incidents that make up your story. Force the characters to move the action forward by looking deep within themselves in solving those ever-worsening problems you devise.

6. What makes a character real and interesting? What questions does a writer need to answer in order to get readers invested in their characters?

writing adviceWell, I wrote an entire book on this, and am working on a follow-up. It’s a bit hard to provide a quick or pithy answer.

I would say the core question to ask is always: What does the character want, and why? The follow-up questions to that include: What is missing from the character’s life? What kind of person does he want to be? What way of life does he yearn to live? Why doesn’t he have it already? What is holding him back—a weakness? A wound? A limitation? Some kind of exterior opposition? A moral flaw? What is his external goal in the story? How does he expect to achieve it? What stands in his way? How does he intend to overcome that obstacle and get what he wants?

writing advice on characterisationI also would seek out what makes the character vulnerable—physically, emotionally, professionally, psychologically.

I would explore secrets and contradictions.

Finally, I would explore key moments in the character’s past when they were helpless, for these moments expose our character in ways we can’t predict. Moments of extreme fear, shame, guilt, betrayal, and loss. To counter-balance these, so that you also understand the character’s hope, willfulness, and confidence, explore moments of great courage, pride, forgiveness, trust, and joy or love.

Overall, remember that each character has struck a balance between pursuing the promise of life, and protecting himself from the pain of life. Your story will disrupt, challenge, and possibly even dismantle that balance.

7. An oft-quoted Vonnegut quote goes: ‘Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible’. As a crime writer, how do you decide how much to tell your reader?

Well, I’m not sure I agree with that. Anne Perry, when asked recently what technique she would advise for presenting backstory, responded, “Intravenous drip.”

And whenever a secret is key to the story, you undermine suspense by revealing it too soon.

Always remember that backstory is behavior. Whatever information you need to provide should be revealed in how your characters act and speak in the environment in which they find themselves. It should intrigue the reader, not baffle or confuse her. But as much as possible, explanations should wait until at least the middle of the story.

writing advice8. Your book, The Art Of Character seems like a wonderful amalgamation of incisive psychoanalysis and imaginative visualization techniques. What did you have in mind when you wrote it?

I wanted to write a guide to characterization that would both instruct and inspire. I drew not only on my own fiction-writing background but my years of studying theater.

9. Tell us about your work as a writing teacher. Where and when can one access your classes online and offline?

You can always learn about upcoming classes, seminars, and workshops at my website, specifically this link.

You can also check out my Facebook page here, and follow me on Twitter here.

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David Corbett writing adviceDavid Corbett is the author of the following long-form works of fiction:

  • The Devil’s Redhead (nominee: Anthony and Barry Awards for Best First Novel)
  • Done for a Dime (NY Times Notable Book; Macavity Award nominee, Best Novel; named “one of the two or three best American crime novels I have ever read” by Patrick Anderson of the Washington Post)
  • Blood of Paradise (nominated for numerous awards, including the Edgar, and named both one of the Top Ten Mysteries and Thrillers of 2007 by the Washington Post and a San Francisco Chronicle Notable Book; published in France in both hardcover and mass-market paperback)
  • Do They Know I’m Running? (Spinetingler Award, Best Novel—Rising Star Category (“a rich, hard-hitting epic”—PW, starred review).
  • The Mercy of the Night (“Superlative hard-boiled crime fiction” —Booklist, Starred Review)
  • The Devil Prayed and Darkness Fell (novella)
  • The Long-Lost Love Letters of Doc Holliday (coming from Black Opal Books, September 2018)

 David Corbett Writing AdviceCorbett’s short fiction and poetry have appeared in journals as diverse as Mission and Tenth, The Smoking Poet, and San Francisco Noir, and his stories have twice been selected for inclusion in Best American Mystery Stories (2009 and 2011). His story “Babylon Sister” was named one of the Top Five Stories of the Week for the two year-period 2015-2016 by Narrative Magazine, while his story “It Can Happen” was nominated for a Macavity Award and has been adapted for TV as a pilot for a Hulu series based on the anthology in which it appeared, San Francisco Noir. His story collection Thirteen Confessions was published in 2016.

He serves as co-chair for the highly regarded Book Passage Mystery Writers’ Conference, where he has served as a faculty member for over ten years. He has also taught at the UCLA Extension’s Writers’ Program, Litreactor, 826 Valencia, and numerous writing conferences across the US, Canada, and Mexico.

Prior to his career as a novelist, he worked as a private investigator for the firm of Palladino & Sutherland in San Francisco, and played a significant role in such headline litigations as The Peoples’ Temple Trial, the first Michael Jackson child molestation scandal, the Cotton Club Murder Case, and many others. For more, visit www.davidcorbett.com

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Are you a reader, a writer, or both?  Do you read or write crime novels? Have you read David’s work before? What do you think of David’s writing advice? As a reader or writer, do you have questions for David Corbett?

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click here to SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL.

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Would You #Donate for a Boy’s #Education via @projectwhy ? #WATWB

We are the World BlogfestTo spread peace and humanity on social media, a few of us have worked together to create the We are the World Blogfest. In a world where news and social media are awash with negativity, we aim to turn the focus on to small but significant stories that renew our faith in humanity.

We are the World Blogfest is here with its twelfth edition. We started this blogfest in March 2017, and barring December, participants have posted heartwarming stories each month.

The cohosts for the March 2018 WATWB are: Belinda WitzenhausenSylvia McGrath, Sylvia Stein  Shilpa Garg, Eric Lahti
——-

 

In the spirit of “In Darkness, Be Light,” I’d like to share the story of Yash from Project Why, who I wrote about here.

Yash landed on Project Why when he was barely two weeks old, born out of wedlock to parents of different faith. Such children are often ‘branded’ for life in India and his future looked bleak. Chances at any normalcy were non-existent as both his parents were married to other people. There were recriminations and even violence. The child watched it all.

A solution was found in adoption: he would be taken to another land where his past would not weigh on him. That was the time a couple from outside the country was visiting Project Why and enquired about the possibility of adopting an Indian child. Introductions were made and went very well!  The adoption procedure began, but it went on forever. The prospective parents visited often and little Yash was plied with gifts and smothered with love. Everyone was waiting for the day when the toddler would leave for his new home.

Damyanti Biswas covers the Nonprofit Project why based in New Delhi India, for her A to Z Blogging Challenge in April 2016The legal case took longer than expected and the child changed from a cuddly baby to a little boy with his own character and temperament. And by the time the case finally concluded in favor of the adoptive parents, a lot had changed. The parents had adopted another baby in their own land. And this little boy still needed a passport to leave his birth land and join his new family.

There was still a lot of red tape to be faced and egos to be appeased. The adoption agency refused to give the required clearance in spite of a court order. The ‘would be’ parents lost interest and the little boy’s future was again in jeopardy.

Project Why Non Profit YashThe change of attitude and then the virtual silence of the adoptive parents and the lack of information from the administration made Project Why come to terms with the fact that they were back to square one, the only difference being that Yash was no longer a baby but a three-year-old boy.

It seemed that no one had a roadmap for Yash so Project Why decided to craft one for him. After the adoption fiasco it was Project Why that ‘adopted’ him. He was a student of the crèche and then was moved to a neighborhood school but more had to be done. Education was his only savior. Project Why decided to send him to Boarding school. He is now in Year VII, and doing very well.

But the fates have conspired against Yash once again: Project Why is scrambling to find funds to keep him in school.

project why WATWBI’m not able to individually support him for the entire amount, though I hope to do my bit in the coming week. This is a call for help–every little bit will help Yash stay in school. The details for donations are in the picture here, but if you need another method, please contact Project Why or Anouradha Bakshi at: projectwhy@ymail.com or anouradha.bakshi@gmail.com. You can donate via local transfer from the USA, UK, Germany and France, the details are HERE.

I’ve worked with Project Why and Anouradha Bakshi for a long while, and can absolutely vouch for both.

If you’d like to take part in this blogfest, sign up in the WE ARE THE WORLD Blogfest Linky List below and please help spread the word on social media via the hashtag #WATWB.

~~~GUIDELINES~~~

  1. Keep your post to below 500 words.
  2. All we ask is you link to a human news story on your blog on the last Friday of each month, one that shows love and humanity.
  3. Join us in sharing news that warms the cockles of our heart. No story is too big or small, as long as it goes beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.
  4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD BLOGFEST Badge on your sidebar, and help us spread the word on social media. Tweets, Facebook shares, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. More We Are the World Blogfest signups mean more friends, love and light for all of us.
  5. We’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships with everyone who signs on as participants in the coming months.
  6. Add your post HERE so we can all find it quickly.

 The We are The World Blogfest Community Page on Facebook will continue to show links to the various blog posts. So you don’t have to hurry through. You can always enjoy one a day. Like the page and share your posts on the thread for the purpose.

Would you donate towards Yash’s education via Project Why? Every rupee or dollar would go a long way towards ensuring that Yash stays in the school where he is flourishing right now.

We Are the World BlogfestPlease join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community (Click on See First).

If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox:  SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL . (Feel free to share this post if you like it. You’ll find icons to re-blog it via WordPress and Blogger to the left of this post.)

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