What would your Fake Book Cover say? #reading

I loved this article on using a Fake Book Cover I read recently:

Fake Book CoverSome people have been known to lie about reading certain books in order to make themselves look smart. But nobody pretends to read certain books to make themselves look deranged or perverted. Nobody but comedian Scott Rogowsky that is.

Not only that but he did it on the New York subway, one of the busiest subway systems in the world. In full view of other passengers, the brave comedian pretended to be engrossed by such questionably-named publications as  ……. Needless to say, several passengers were more than a little surprised by the comedian’s seemingly shameless interest in “alternative” literature, although it certainly made their commute to work a little more interesting than usual.

I love some of the Fake Book Covers used by the comedian– they certainly made me chortle! Visit the link to see the covers, I omitted them here because this is a PG13 blog. A fake book cover can make wonderful statements about our culture, about what is considered appropriate, elitist, or, in some cases, could act as statements to the public.

I would definitely buy and use on my commutes fake book covers that said, “How to Teach the Youth to Give Their Train Seats to the Elderly” or “Top Ways Not To Obstruct Traffic When Playing PokeMon Go” and so on.

 Have you ever seen or used a fake book cover? If you did, what would your fake book cover say? Leave me a few ideas for a Fake Book Cover in the comments if you like. Please use asterisks if your titles contain NSFW words!

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What are you #reading ? #FridayReads

Reading novels and short stories
Books, books!

Reading novels and short stories has been my salvation for as long as I can remember. This year, I’ve struggled with health and work issues, but my reading has again come to the rescue.

In these past few weeks these novels and short stories have gathered on my bedside table:
1. This isn’t the sort of thing that happens to someone like you : Jon McGregor

2. The Oxford book of Japanese short stories : Theodore W. Goosssen

3. The Ballad of a Small Player: Lawrence Osborne

4. The Night Guest: Fiona McFarlane

5. Gold boy, Emerald girl: YiYun Li

6. Midnight Sun: Jo Nesbo

7. Chocolat : Joanne Harris

8. Instructions for a Heatwave: Maggie O’ Farrell

9. High Rise: J G Ballard

I’m dipping into one or the other as time and health permits.

Of course, I’m also reading fabulous short stories for the Forge Literary Magazine. Recently these short stories I picked and edited were published: A Little More Full and Less Empty and Sea Wolf.

Add to the hit counter on both of them, if you please, and tell me what you think?

What novels and short stories are you reading? Would you recommend a book you read this year? Drop me the title in the comments, and I’ll look it up!

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