What Do You Cherish in Your Life? #CBF17

Blogging is all about making connections, sharing information, emotions, opinions, memories. One of the best blogging advice I have for new bloggers is to participate in a Blogfest: choose something easy, and make new friends!

I made a fair number through the Cherished Blogfest. The cohosts this year are Dan AntionCheryl PenningtonPeter NenaSharukh Bamboat, Mary Giese, and Kate PowellPaul Ruddock, and yours truly. I’ve been away, so my post is up late, and I’m off to visit everyone on the list today.

The Cherished blogfest is open to anyone who wants to tell the world about something or someone they cherish. If you want to join us, click here. The blogfest is open until Midnight Sunday, 23 October.

Here’s my post for last year. The ask for the blogfest was this:

Often, objects lead us to memories.

The objects we hold most dear, harbor the most cherished memories.

For the CHERISHED Blogfest 2017, we invite you to talk to us about one of your cherished objects. Tell us what it is, post a picture of it if you like, and tell us why you cherish it.

Keep your post to below 500 words.

We will share memories, emotions, information: we’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships.


My Cherished entity this year is my blog, and all You guys.

BlogfestI’ve now written on this space for about a decade, and have come to know some of you over the years. I count you amongst my friends, and look forward to your likes and comments. I’m active on social media, but nothing could ever replace the exchange of ideas and emotion I’ve experienced thanks to this blog. Your kindness has kept me going at times, and though I’m never very personal on here, your words have often given me comfort during the hard times– it has been a safe space to come back to.

I’ve been away for a while, traveling the Scottish highlands, and this blog was never far from my thoughts: a post about my trip will be up soon.

The Cherished Signup list is here: add the link to your Cherished post, not your blog.

How long have you been blogging? Have you taken part in any blogfests? Organised them? If yes, have blogfests helped your blog? Are you signed up for We Are the World Blogfest? Do you follow the Cherished Blogfest page? Will you be signing up for the CHERISHED Blogfest 2017?

I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post the last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity. You could add a link and a badge to one of your regular posts that weekend, in order to participate.Writer's RetreatPlease join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button. (Feel free to share this post if you like it. You’ll find icons to re-blog it via WordPress and Blogger to the left of this post.)

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Want #Writing and #SocialMedia Tips from Author and Book Doctor, Roz Morris? #IWSG

Here on Daily (w)rite, as part of the ongoing guest post series, it is my absolute pleasure today to welcome to this site author Roz Morris, whose blog has been an essential part of my writing life. She’s an award-nominated author, book doctor, ghostwriter and writing teacher. The highlights of her insightful responses are marked in blue.

(This is an #IWSG post, and I’m scheduling this up early due to previous commitments.)

1. At what age did you start writing fiction? What prompted you?

Roz Morris Writing booksI’ve always written. I was a shy kid who didn’t talk a lot out loud, but made up stories constantly. So I wrote a lot, but never thought it could end up as fully-fledged books. Two people made me change my mind.

The first was a schoolteacher when I was 17. When she talked about Shakespeare and Dickens she brought them ferociously alive. She cornered me after an exam and I thought it must be because I’d written something dumb. Actually, she said: ‘your essay on Chaucer was brilliant and you should write novels’.

I still didn’t take writing seriously until, 20 years on, I met Person Number Two – I married a writer. While getting to know literary agents and publishers, I got a break as a ghostwriter – and published about a dozen novels under top-secret conditions. I still see copies of them around people’s houses today but I can’t tell you what they are! But I didn’t feel I’d earned my spurs until I released a novel under my own name.  My first novel was My Memories of a Future Life. It arose from one of those ‘what-if’ ideas – you can go back to past lives by hypnosis, but what if you went forwards?

My second novel, Lifeform Three, is about a future time where all the countryside has disappeared – except for one glorious green valley with an old house which is now a theme park. It was inspired by my love of the English countryside and horse riding – I thought how long will this last? Lifeform Three was longlisted for the World Fantasy Award.

And now I’ve got a narrative non-fiction book as well – Not Quite Lost: Travels Without a Sense of Direction.

Roz Morris Writing advice2. In your opinion, what makes a successful novel?

I can only answer as a writer. Rewriting is the big secret. Successful books aren’t just a string of well-chosen words; they’re a hidden mechanism of structure and characterisation as well. The best piece of advice I could give an aspiring writer is to learn how to critically appraise your own work.

3. What are the top books on your reading list right now?

I’m always tripping over things I want to read. At the moment the queue looks like this.

  • The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier – it’s about two men who swap identities, the classic ‘double’ story. I’m looking forward to her take.
  • Bel Canto by Ann Patchett – the novel about a siege in a South American embassy. I’m rereading it because its vibe fits well with the novel I’m currently writing (Ever Rest).
  • The Constant Gardener by John le Carre – It’s classic le Carre territory, with tangled conspiracies and characters who are mesmerising and vulnerable. I started reading it a few months ago, then got diverted by another book I had to read for my work. I have it on the nightstand, ready to start again.
  • Helliconia Spring by Brian Aldiss – about a planet where the seasons are enormously extended. I’m eager to see what he does with such a potent idea.

4. You’re a renowned ghostwriter. Could you point us to some resources for those interested in breaking into this kind of writing?

I get asked this a lot, so I created a course. It explains what ghostwriting is, where ghostwriters are used (they’re far more common than you’d think!), how to pitch for a project, how to find opportunities, how to handle the client … everything you need! .

5. Which authors have been your biggest influences?

Too many to list! I must have been reading since I first plugged brain into eyes.

I love authors with a graceful turn of language, an eye for the unusual, compelling characters and a strong storytelling drive. Iain Banks was an influence on My Memories of a Future Life – his novel The Bridge has a character living two lives.

For Lifeform Three I was influenced by Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, for his combination of futurism and nostalgia.

I like Barbara Trapido, Sophie Kinsella, Barbara Vine and John le Carre for their human, vulnerable, troubled characters. (Yes, you don’t often see those writers mentioned in the same breath!) Joan Didion and Helen Macdonald for their unsparing observation. Gerald Durrell, James Herriot and Gavin Maxwell for the deep affection in everything they write.

6. What would you recommend to an author seeking to build a platform?

Choose a few social media sites where your kinds of readers tend to hang out. I principally use Twitter and Facebook. Depending on the books you write, you might find Instagram or Wattpad are good for you.

A website to display your work is important. You might also have a blog to create shareable posts and bring you a wider audience.

A newsletter – collect email addresses from people who are interested in your books and send out an occasional message to let them know what you’re working on.

Take your time. Treat it as if you’re moving into a new town and trying to find the people who are most like you. Be friendly, and see who you get on with.

Roz Morris Writing social media tips

7.  As a creative writing teacher, what advice would you give to aspiring/ emerging fiction writers? Could you talk about your own journey as a writer and writing teacher in this context?

Read a lot! Although you can learn storytelling techniques from movies, you must also learn from prose because prose has its own characteristics.

When I’m teaching, I often find aspiring authors trying to use tricks from movies that simply don’t work in a book – like scenes with a lot of characters talking. And, conversely, they don’t realise that prose makes other kinds of scene very easy – such as passage of time.

While reading, analyse your reactions – if you like a character, ask yourself what the author did to make you feel that way. This is how I learned – and I still do.



8. In your opinion, what factors should guide an author when deciding between self-publishing and going the traditional route?

I’d always advise to look for a publishing deal because you need the widest options possible. You can always decide to self-publish if that’s a better situation.

If you get an offer, look at the long term. A publisher will give you two kinds of help – what are they worth to you?

1 There’s editorial help – producing the book to a publishable standard. There are standard processes, like proofing, and there are more specialised processes such as developmental editing for the audience and designing a cover that will attract the right readers.

2 There’s also marketing and publicity. Does the publisher have good influence? Will they get your book seen in places that you couldn’t get to by yourself or by hiring dedicated book PR?

You need to weigh up the publisher’s expertise, experience and connections. Also, look at what they will take from you – not just the sales income, but other rights such as
Translation rights
• Other editions – your book can be an ebook, a print book, an audiobook, a movie…
• Reversion rights – if the book doesn’t sell, can you reclaim the rights and take it to a different publisher or publish it yourself?
• Non-compete clauses – some publishers won’t want you to write anything else while you’re under contract to them.

9. You’ve written books targeted at writers. Could you tell us more about the impetus behind them? Roz morris on Writing booksWhat sort of writers would benefit?

My Nail Your Novel books! I’ve mentored a lot of writers, and I wrote the Nail Your Novels from the issues they most commonly have trouble with.

Book 1 is a step-by-step plan for writing and revising. I wrote it because I realized so many writers were starting out with a great idea and then getting muddled or disillusioned. Or if an editor suggested they restructure, they were completely lost – they’d got a manuscript of 65,000 words, how on earth could they move plot threads or combine characters? I realised I did this kind of thing without turning a hair, so I wrote Nail Your Novel: Why Writers Abandon Books & How You Can Draft, Fix & Finish With ConfidenceBook 2 builds on that with the mistakes I commonly see with characters. Book 3 is plot. And the books are short and bite-sized – you can dip in, find a helpful suggestion, and get back to your writing.

10. Some writing and publishing professionals believe that creative writing cannot be taught— that those who profess to do so merely spot existing talent and help polish it. Where do you stand on this?

There are two elements here.

1. Talent – every profession on the planet involves using an aptitude. I would be useless in any job that involves maths, for instance, because I have no natural feel for numbers. But I’m lucky to have a flair for words, and so I’ll gravitate to professions where that sensitivity will be an advantage.

I think creativity is difficult to teach if a person doesn’t have the natural inclination. I know a lot of people who tell me they simply cannot ‘invent’ or make those creative leaps.

2. Speaking as a teacher, I’ve noticed that inexperienced writers have certain things they do very well, and other areas that are blind spots. This is where we see the other element – work. A tutor can guide and steer, but the writer has to put in the hours. All arts are learned by self-directed study. And it’s often frustrating, so we need a lot of persistence too.

So I agree that we can’t make a person creative. They either are or they’re not. But – except for the odd genius – even the talented people have blind spots and they need to be directed by experienced hands. But innate talent makes it easier to learn a craft to a professional standard.

Roz Morris Writing Not Quite Lost11. Tell us about your latest book: Not Quite Lost: Travels Without A Sense of Direction. How did this lighthearted travel memoir come about, and did you have an ideal reader in mind when you wrote it?

Not Quite Lost started with a big leather-bound diary I carry with me when I travel. After a while I had so many stories about odd places and adventures that I thought I’d publish them properly. I guess the ideal reader would be people who enjoy Bill Bryson’s humour and sense of wry wonder, and also a bit of Jon Ronson’s sense of absurdity. And, to bring things full circle, one of the stories is about how I finally started writing as myself instead of as a ghost.

Have you read books by Roz Morris? Have you worked with an editor, book doctor or a ghost writer? What was the experience like? Would you like to talk about the influence of writing teachers? Do you have questions for Roz ? As a reader what genre do you prefer? Do you read novels, no-fiction, or short fiction, or all of these forms?

Roz Morris is an award-nominated novelist (My Memories of a Future Life; Lifeform Three), book doctor to award-winning writers (Roald Dahl Funny Prize 2012), has sold 4 million books as a ghostwriter and teaches writing masterclasses for The Guardian. Her first non-fiction collection, Not Quite Lost, is now available. Find out more here. When not at her desk, her favourite place in the world is on the back of a horse, exploring the old commons, byways and woods of Surrey, UK. Her website is here, her blog is here, her Facebook page is here, you can tweet her as @Roz_Morris.


IWSG Writing groupThis post was written for the IWSG. Thanks to Alex J. Cavanaugh for organizing and hosting the Insecure Writer’s Support Group (IWSG) every month! Go to the site to see the other participants. In this group we writers share tips, self-doubt, insecurities, and of course, discuss the act of writing. If you’re a writer and a blogger, go join rightaway! Co-hosts this month are: Olga Godim, Chemist Ken, Jennifer Hawes, and Tamara Narayan!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page (Click the See First button) in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you found this post useful, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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Is Your #Coffee Wildlife-Friendly? #WATWB

We are the World BlogfestWe are the World Blogfest is here with its seventh edition.

To spread peace and humanity on social media, a few of us have worked together to create the We are the World Blogfest. In a world where news and social media are awash with negativity, we aim to turn the focus on to small but significant stories that renew our faith in humanity.

The co-hosts for the August 2017 WATWB are: Michelle Wallace , Shilpa GargAndrea MichaelsPeter NenaEmerald Barnes

Please go and visit them– they’ve been doing a wonderful job of cohosting the #WATWB behind the scenes.


Would you try wildlife-friendly coffee ?

In the spirit of “In Darkness, Be Light,” I’d like to share the story of Avinash Sosale and Dr. Krithi Karanth, the Indian husband and wife team who have founded Wild Kaapi, a unique endeavour to make wildlife-friendly coffee. Dr. Karanth has decades of wildlife study and conservation experience behind her, and Sosale is an entrepreneur and coffee lover. In India, where wildlife cover and biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate, the world’s first ‘certified wildlife-friendly’ coffee brand is a heartening initiative.

“Wild Kaapi started as an offshoot of a three-year research project (part of a grant by the National Science Foundation to study coffee, areca and rubber plantations in the Western Ghats). Karanth, of the Centre for Wildlife Studies — with Paul Robbins of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Dr Ashwini Chhatre of University of Illinois — measured biodiversity, and studied labour practices and market dynamics of the farming areas.

During the project, she interacted with over 1,000 planters in the three coffee growing areas of Karnataka — Kodagu, Chikmagalur, and Hassan — and realised how frustrated they were “because they weren’t getting value for their coffee due to the middlemen involved”. That’s when the idea for Wild Kaapi originated, and the duo is now exploring new ways to get a premium price for products that support wildlife.”

coffee

Since they ship internationally, and maintain excellent quality standards, I’m planning an order soon. I shall let the coffee-lover in the family try it out, and do my best to support this fledgling company that has such a laudable mission statement:

‘The idea behind setting up Wild Kaapi was to find a way to keep them wildlife friendly, reduce deforestation, minimize the usage of chemical inputs, implement good labour practices and at the same incentivize the process for the farmers.’

If you found this piece of news heartening, and would like to take part in this blogfest, sign up in the WE ARE THE WORLD Blogfest Linky List below and please help spread the word on social media via the hashtag #WATWB.

~~~GUIDELINES~~~

  1. Keep your post to below 500 words.
  2. All we ask is you link to a human news story on your blog on the last Friday of each month, one that shows love and humanity.
  3. Join us in sharing news that warms the cockles of our heart. No story is too big or small, as long as it goes beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity.
  4. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD BLOGFEST Badge on your sidebar, and help us spread the word on social media. Tweets, Facebook shares, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. More We Are the World Blogfest signups mean more friends, love and light for all of us.
  5. We’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships with everyone who signs on as participants in the coming months.
  6. Add your post HERE so we can all find it quickly.

#WATWB also wants to link to charities supported by the co-hosts, and you could choose to donate to some of them or add links to local charities you support. Here’s the organization I’ve come to love and support: PROJECT WHY— and here’s one of my previous posts on the work they do. Feel free to send them a little of your help– every little bit counts.

 The We are The World Blogfest Community Page on Facebook will continue to show links to the various blog posts. So you don’t have to hurry through. You can always enjoy one a day. Like the page and share your posts on the thread for the purpose.

Would you support a wild-life friendly brand? Are you a coffee lover? What heartwarming story have you heard recently? Do you have stories of wildlife or environment-friendly brands that you’d like to share?

We Are the World BlogfestPlease join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community (Click on See First).

If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button. (Feel free to share this post if you like it. You’ll find icons to re-blog it via WordPress and Blogger to the left of this post.)

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How Did You Find This Blog Post? #Blogging

Blog directionBlog promotion, or promotion of any sort, is not really my strong suit.

This blog is old, and does have regular subscribers (Thankyou so much!), but I’ve really never made much of an effort to find out more about how those who read it, get here.

I’m happy that I get to interact with my blog friends, and since this blog is more of a passion than an avenue for monetization, blog promotion has never been on my mind.

Recently, a friend asked me what my blog was about, and what direction I wanted to take it in.

I said, I’d like to keep doing what I do, write about reading, writing, the occasional travel, ask questions about life and blogging, and some about compassion and goodness in our world.

And who is your target audience? This friend said. You could use some targeting, and blog promotion.

I know my readers find the posts on writing useful: I try and interview experts, and host posts from those who know about the business of writing and publishing. As to the rest, folks who come here seem to like the interaction, the freedom to express themselves, and answering questions–most of my posts in recent years have been question-oriented. I’d rather listen than talk, because that way I get to learn much (and of course, hide my foolishness from all and sundry.)

My friend, who knows a thing or two about blogging, says that’s not nearly enough.

To humor my friend, and also because I’m interested, I wanted to ask you: how exactly did you reach this post?

Could you please take a few seconds to click on this poll?


If you’re a subscriber, a follower, or a return visitor (Thanks very much, I’m honored!) what made you return?

For every friend I’ve made on this site, I’m grateful.

I feel like I know you, even though we’ve never met. That we’d get along very well if we do ever get to meet. That I’d love to listen to you talk. In the last 9 years, this blog has sometimes been my lifeline– and even though I’m never too personal here, this blog holds immense personal value.

What about you? Do you know who your target audience is? Do you write to them? Do you know where most of your blog followers come from and why? Do you think that is important? Would like to suggest ways for me to improve this site, and what you’d like to see more or less of?

——

I co-host the monthly We Are the World Blogfest: I’d like to invite you to join, if you haven’t as yet, to post Fvourite Placethe last Friday of each month a snippet of positive news that shows our essential, beautiful humanity.

This monthly event has brought smiles on the faces of a lot of participants and their audiences, and somewhat restored their faith in humanity. Here’s a sampler. Click here to know more. Sign up here and add your bit of cheer to the world on the next installment this Friday, the September 29th!

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page (Click the See First button to receive all the posts) in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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Writers , Want Tips on #Reading to Audiences? #amwriting

Here on Daily (w)rite, as part of the guest post series, it is my absolute pleasure today to welcome Tania Hershman, who’s been on this site before, and is one of my idols when it comes to writing short stories. She’s here to talk about one of the things I find most difficult about the writing life: performing your work in front of audiences.

So here’s Tania on writing and performing her work!

—————

I am writing this while listening to music on my computer, which seems fitting for a piece on performing your own work. Getting out of the house, getting up in front of of an audience, standing (or sometimes sitting) holding a piece of paper, a sheaf of papers, a book, or sometimes empty-handed, and giving yourself directly to a group of people. Does this make it sound as joyous as it is for me? I hope so! I know, though, that it is not a pleasure for many writers, so let’s talk about it.

I’ve been writing seriously for about 20 years, although it really all started in childhood. But a year or so ago, I changed my Twitter profile from “writer” to “writer/performer” as I realised that performing my work, giving readings, was becoming almost as important as the writing itself, or at least as important as being published. A wonderful friend with whom I am developing a two-woman poetry and prose performance sent me a quote recently from American poet Stanley Kunitz in which he talks about a writer reading her work in public as a “secondary act of creation”, and this is how it feels to me. It is not simply a live presentation of what is already on a page; it is connection with others, an intimacy of the shared physical space and time, an experience that – although it may be being recorded – is in fact ephemeral and unrepeatable. You have to be there.

Tania Hershman performing poemsLet’s talk about fear. Many of us are writers precisely because we prefer to communicate through the written word. I know I do. I’m not much of a talker. I am introverted, not comfortable socializing in crowds, preferring one-on-one conversation. I feel I am at my most fluent when I am writing. But, perhaps surprisingly, I love being on stage. This began in my twenties when I did a lot of amateur dramatics and discovered I enjoyed becoming other people, slipping into character. This familiarity with the stage turns out to be immensely helpful when you have a book out – or, nowadays, with the blossoming of the live lit scene, where writers are invited to perform at open mic events.

You might think from this that I slip into a character when I read from my own work, that I become Tania The Performer, different from Tania The Writer (who, perhaps, is different from Tania The Person). But I don’t consciously do this, I don’t put on a mask, I get up in front of people as myself, as much as possible. I don’t want to hide from the audience, I want that connection, that act of co-creation. And this has shifted as I have made the shift from writing short stories to writing poetry. When I read my short fiction, I have to look down at the page quite often, although I try and make eye contact frequently. But poetry is entirely different – I write poems out loud and in the act of editing them, I memorise them, so when I read poetry to an audience, although I have the page open, I rarely need to look at it. Performing my poems, I feel a more intense sense of co-creation: I am reading and being seen by the audience, and I am also seeing them, looking at them, at you.

Terms and Conditions Tania Performing poemsBut what of the practicalities? Well, as with writing, everyone finds their own way to read to an audience. I have been enthralled by readings where the writer hasn’t looked up once from the page. I prefer to stand completely still, but some people like to move around, to pace. I would say that you should do whatever makes you the most comfortable, what fits with your own kind of connection.

What to read? For a long time I thought I “should” only read crowd-pleasers, by which I mean light, funny pieces that make an audience laugh. No-one wants the really dark stuff, I thought. But as my confidence as a performer increased, and as I went to more events, I realised that as an audience member I am happy to be made to cry, to be shaken by a performance as I am by the page. And so now I read whatever I feel I want to read at a particular event, given the nature of the event, who else I am reading with, the length of time I’ve been given. I always make myself a “set-list” in advance, but quite often will adjust the list just before I go on – or in the middle of the performance, especially if another reader has read something that I think chimes with one of my pieces.

When, like me, you are a writer of very short things – short short stories and poems – I feel that it’s important to allow the audience to breathe in between, not to go straight from one to another. To say something in between, not necessarily (as I have noticed many poets do) explaining either what you have just read or are just about to read, sometimes in great detail. But you can tell the audience, perhaps, where you were when you wrote the piece, or a little detail about your day, or you can even ask the audience a question! A lot of my work is inspired by science and I like to mention if a particular story or poem was inspired by an article and then ask if other people in the audience read New Scientist, say, or take inspiration from science. This breaks that “fourth wall” between performer and audience. I should say that this is something I’ve only found the confidence to do very recently, after around 7 years of readings, and you shouldn’t feel pressure to do this.

If there is one thing I would strongly caution everyone not to do it is this: disclaimers. Do not apologise, either for your work, or for yourself and your performance. You may be trying to be funny, but this kind of self-deprecating humour, especially if the audience don’t yet know you or your work, is very difficult to pull off and it sets the audience up to expect to be disappointed. I see this again and again. “Oh, this poem is silly but I thought I’d read it to you anyway”. Be kind to yourself and be kind enough to your audience to allow them to receive your work and make up their own minds, as we do when we send written work out into the world.

Tania Performing poemsMost of all: good luck! Public speaking of any kind is acknowledged as one of the most terrifying things any of us might be asked to do. You don’t have to do it. You never have to do it. But if you think you’d like to, if you want to push yourself, it can be one of the most rewarding and elating experiences and it breathes new life into your own work and it may even change the way you write. Break a leg!

Writers, what is your experience of performing your work?

As a reader or writer have you attended poetry or prose readings? Do you have a memorable experience to share?

Do you have questions for Tania Hershman about her performances, the writing life, or do you need any writing advice?

Tania Hershman is currently to be found somewhere in the UK, reading from/performing her two new books – her debut poetry collection, Terms and Conditions (Nine Arches Press, 2017) and her third short story collection, Some Of Us Glow More Than Others (Unthank Books, 2017). You can hear her read from her own work on Soundcloud and watch videos of her performing her poems and prose at her site , where there is also more information about her writings.

Please join Daily (w)rite on its Facebook Page in case you’d like to be heard by this community. If you liked this post, you can have biweekly posts delivered to your inbox: click the SUBSCRIBE VIA EMAIL button.

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