Are Readers Entitled to Read Books for Free? #Amreading #Amwriting

Read free booksPirating e-books is not a new trend. Right after ebooks hit big time, torrent content became something of a norm, spoken about in hushed tones by readers the world over. ‘Read books for free’ became a cool thing.

I recently read this article from an author about her frustrations with piracy.

She questioned readers’ conscience: how could anyone steal from an author who has worked so very hard to write a book?

Not surprisingly, most authors defended her stand, and (some) readers defended themselves and the practice of piracy. The comments on the article are almost as enlightening and depressing as the article itself, for different reasons.

“Oh. You want stories in your favorite genres by your favorite authors and you want them today, without having to pay for them, regardless of their listed price. Yeah, that’s entitlement. And when you download them illegally from a pirate site or torrent, that’s stealing. Let’s just get the terms right, okay?

Come to think of it, the notion that books should be free might be a big factor in why many publishing houses are dropping their lines of cozy mysteries–they simply aren’t profitable enough, despite the existing fan base. Think about that.”

She’s made an impassioned plea on behalf of all authors: do not steal our work. There are various ways of reading books for free or for small change: libraries, Bookbub, Kindle Unlimited to name but a few. But like I said in a comment to her, writers will always be shortchanged because there are so many of us who will write despite being mostly underpaid or unpaid, for the passion of it. We end up ensuring that supply is always higher than demand, so we draw the short stick each time, whether as an indie or a trad-pubbed author.

If you’re an author, here’s a way to find out if any of your work is plagiarized or being sold or downloaded without your permission by people who want to read books for free.

What about you? Are you a reader, or a writer, or both? As a reader would you use torrent to read free books? As a writer, have you had your work stolen and or used in an unauthorized way? What have you done about it? Should people be able to read books for free, by essentially stealing them online?

The first ever story I picked and edited for the Forge literary magazine is now up. Please add to its hit counter, will you?

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How to Structure a Novel #Writetip

Here on Daily (w)rite, author and editor Michael Dellert has spoken about how start a novel, a post that continues to be popular. Today he’s here to talk about story structure, with fantastic tips on how to structure a novel, some of which I highlight below for you in blue.

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Story Structure: Romance of Eowain
Romance of Eowain

Many writers don’t consider the science behind the creative art of writing a novel or story structure. But having worked both sides of the book business (author v. publisher), I can tell you: there is certainly a science to story structure in a novel.

“Great is the art of beginning,” said Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. “But greater still is the art of ending.”

Beginnings are easy. The real trick is to keep a story running without stalling or blocking, to reach the end. To do this, you need a roadmap for getting to the end. That’s where the science of story structure comes in.

Story Structure: Ideal Novel Length

For our purposes here, we’ll stick with the basics: the Three Act Story Structure. With a basic plot structure and some characters in mind, you just write your book and let it end wherever it wants to end, right?

No. Before you get started, you need to determine the correct length for your novel. Plenty of good reasons for this, but the most important is very simple: goal-setting. Knowing your target word-count helps you determine how many scenes you need, and how many viewpoint characters you can use. But how can you know all this from a simple word-count ?

Story structure: Scenes, Viewpoint Characters, and Word-Count

In 1998, the highly-successful literary agent, Evan Marshall, published a how-to-write-a-novel guide entitled, The Marshall Plan for Novel Writing. It’s a highly formalized, structured approach to novel writing, not dissimilar from other plans such as The Snowflake Method. Some decry The Marshall Plan for being too “formulaic.” This is absolutely true, so whether this approach to “art” is for you or not is for you to decide, but as a method for understanding the basics of story structure, I recommend it.

In Part Two of The Marshall Plan, Mr. Marshall puts forward a chart called “The NovelMaster.” For the purpose of illustration, I’ve reproduced a portion of this chart here:

Novel Story Structure Marshall Plan
Novel Story Structure: Marshall Plan
  1. As you can see, the left column presents a word-count range for the entire length of your novel. For a novel in each given range, the chart then indicates how many scenes should appear in the Beginning, how many in the Middle, and how many at the End, as well as the total count of scenes for the novel.
  2. But this is where the genius of this chart really emerges. For each word-count range, the chart also indicates the maximum number of viewpoint characters, and goes on to show the distribution of scenes among those characters. So a novel of 50,000 words should have 40 scenes total, 10 at the beginning and the end, with 20 in the middle. It should have no more than 2 viewpoint characters, the lead and a secondary character (sidekick, romantic interest, villain, etc).
  3. The lead character always gets the lion’s share of scenes in the story (in this case, 24 scenes), and secondary characters receive correspondingly fewer scenes (in our example, our secondary character would have 16 scenes). An epic monster of 100,000 words would have 80 scenes (distributed 20/40/20), with four viewpoint characters, and scenes distributed 48/11/11/10 by character.
  4. This is the method that I use to structure, organize, and inspire my own work, such as my recent 70,000-word novel, The Romance of Eowain. Below, you can see the roadmap I used to get me from the first word to the last word of the story structure.
Story structure of Romance of Eowain
Story structure of Romance of Eowain

5. I broke up my story idea into scenes, then broke down those scenes by viewpoint characters. I then assigned actions to each scene, and described those actions from a single character’s point of view.

Just because one starts from a formula doesn’t mean one’s story is necessarily slaved to that formula. By no means was I slavish to this plan.

  • My initial goal was to write a 65,000 word novel, but this grew to 70,000 words during rewrites.
  • In one scene, I used alternating POVs to represent both sides of a board game.
  • In another scene, I elided briefly from the main character to a secondary character and back again.

Any formula should be nothing more than a jumping off point, and innovation and experimentation with the form should be at the front of any writer’s mind. But getting from the beginning to the end of a draft is essential to becoming a published author, because one can’t edit what ain’t writ.

This method has proven over and over again to be successful in getting me from beginning to end and back again, but every writer’s process is different. What are some tricks you use to get to that draft done?

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Michael Dellert Story structure tips for Novel
Michael Dellert

Michael Dellert is an award-winning writer, editor, publishing consultant, and writing coach with a publishing career spanning 18 years. He currently lives and works in the Greater New York City area. His third book, The Romance of Eowain, is a Celtic medieval fantasy adventure-romance set in his Matter of Manred universe. You can learn more about Michael on his blog, Adventures in Indie Publishing, or follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

 Do you structure your novel beforehand? If yes, do any of your novels follow the plan above? Finished a novel and have tips for those who want to do the same? Do you have questions for Michael on how to start your novel? Have at it in the comments!

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